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SEVEN SONGS ESSENTIAL TO THE EARLY ROOTS OF JAZZ

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“A Devilishly Enjoyable Listen!”
-OpenSourceMusic

Here are seven Jazz songs you should hear and know about:

“Doo Wacka Doo” performed by Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra. This zany song is a perfect example of the JOY and FUN created by several talented musicians playing off of each other. Listen and more

“Hot Lips” performed by Bill Brown and His Brownies. The interplay between musicians is evident as the individual musicians perform. Listen and more

“Washboard Wiggles” performed by Tiny Parham and his Musicians. The washboard, a common American folk instrument, is introduced to Jazz, and takes a solo. Listen and more

“Toodles” performed by The Charleston 7. The blending of the musicians in front of one mic to record this to 78 disc is quite a feat, sounding this good is a testament to amazing musicianship. Listen and more

“Everybody’s Charleston Crazy” performed by The Georgia Melodians. They recorded this song based on the world-wide dance craze, “The Charleston.” The Melodians were one of the first “studio bands.” Listen and more

“Rock and Gravel” performed by Syl Valentine and The Patent Leather kids. This combo is taken to musical heights by their collective music intelligence. Believe it or not this three-piece combo produces a full sound. Listen and more

“Frankie and Johnnie” performed by The Quality Four. The solos in this recording are stupendous, plus this track was performed live in one take. Listen and more

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HUMAN MUSIC INTELLIGENCE

Music only humans can create.

Listen for FREE to the music posted here.  Examples of Music only humans can create. This site is devoted to posting examples of music created by HUMANS.

Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone.  This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music,  

I’m trying to preserve examples of  “human’s unique” involvement in music. I’ve watched the technology of the recording process change the aesthetic of music appreciation.  So I’ve decided to “Master for Streaming” some examples of human music interaction.  I selected early jazz  and blues recordings. These recordings were recorded with ONE microphone, NO samples, NO overdubs, ONE take.

Wham, Bam, Thank You, Ma’am

There is a joy of collaboration that several musicians create by playing together.  

Many of the timeless songs are perfect examples of unique contributions made by man.

LOVE THE BLUES: “WHEN THE LEVEE BREAKS”

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In 1929, Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie, while they were still married, are responsible for this song that has been updated by the Led Zeppelin and Bob Dylan.




Joe McCoy sings this song about life in the Mississippi Delta and the great flood of 1927, while the extraordinary guitar work is Memphis Minnie at her best.

WHY I “LOVE THE BLUES” MUSIC

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I love the Blues! More examples of humans making music. Blues creators were the among the earliest recording artists. Most of these blues artists didn’t have the luxury of a combo of musicians to accompany them. So, simple self-accompaniment was common. Much of the material reflects an individual’s impression of life in the Deep South for the American Negro. The unique combination of song and vocal conveying a singular message is the formula for most of the early Blues. There are so many unique Blues songs, and their influences are felt far and wide.  The song and the vocal are very important in popular music and also are essential in the blues. These humans making blues music were rarely rewarded and were usually paid a flat fee for their efforts. Record royalties weren’t given to these artists. The recording budgets were very small, one take, one microphone, one small payment to the artist. The recording was considered “race” music, only sold and marketed in minority regions, basically in the American South. Many of these recordings made their way to Europe where they became considered art and considered very valuable. These recordings and the genre heavily influenced the artists of the golden age of recording. Many artists who earned enormous royalties based their works on Blues artists of the past.

The Blues needs to be enjoyed in its original form, so the selected music contains all the elements of the blues. I’ve selected blues songs that rocked my world!